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February 11, 2019 00:27:40 | Faisul Yaseen

Sterlite Power to start ‘tree translocation’

 To promote greener ecosystem, Sterlite Power, one of India’s largest power transmission sector players, instead of cutting trees coming in way of transmission lines and towers would start “tree translocation”.
Sterlite Power is the leading global developer of power transmission infrastructure with projects of over 12,816 circuit km and 22,044 MVA in India and Brazil, the largest country in South America.
Last year, Sterlite Power announced commissioning of 414-km long Rs 3000 crore Northern Region Strengthening Scheme 29 (NRSS 29), its flagship project critical for meeting the power requirements of Jammu Kashmir.
CEO, Global Infrastructure, Sterlite Power, Ved Mani Tiwari said the idea of “tree translocation” was to implement the project in the most environment-friendly manner.
He said the project was Sterlite Power’s way of contributing to promote a green habitat.
The initiative helps maintain air filtration and produces sufficient oxygen reducing soil erosion and conserving the energy.
The “transplanted trees” are provided alternate habitat within 500 metres to maintain the balance in the eco-system.
As part of its Khargone Transmission project (KTL), Sterlite Power is presently carrying its pilot project in Indore, the largest city of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
Talking to Rising Kashmir in Indore, Project Director, Sterlite Power, B K Singh said the company first surveyed 100 varieties of trees, studying their age and diameter.
“The idea is to make environment-friendly social impact innovation,” Singh said.
He said the success ratio of the survival of the “transplanted trees” was slightly less than 100 percent.
Illustrating the importance of the project, Singh said while the government intends to have 100 percent electrified villages, the requirement of power transmission lines was going up.
The project aims to reduce 40 percent of felling of trees.
Communication Head, Sterlite Power, Balaji Krishnaswami told Rising Kashmir that the company got the idea of starting “tree translocation” after receiving a WhatsApp video from Finland.
“In Finland, tree translocation is done in the mining industry, and in India it is done in the mining industry and forest development,” he said. “So, we thought why not in power.”
The “tree translocation” is carried with ‘Tree Transplanter Machine’, FMX 460 Model 8x4 Volvo Truck, which has an ‘Auto Transmission Gear Box’.
Three persons work simultaneously on the machine while transplanting the trees.
Volvo Technical Support Ravi Kumar, Technical Operators Kanta Raju and Satta Babu were the three men running the ‘Tree Transplanter Machine’ in Indore.
The trio had received training in Bangalore from the Swedish trainers.
Talking to Rising Kashmir, Volvo Technical Support Ravi Kumar said the ‘Tree Transplanter Machine’ operates with an “intelligent shifting gearbox” and being an “off-road vehicle”, it locks at 45 km/hour during “tree transplantation” and at 80 to 90 km/hour on road.
Farmers Bal Mukul Chaudhary, Shankar Chauhan, Dev Singh Chauhan and Radha Sham Chaudhary had come from Burana Kheri, a village nearby from where the pilot project is carried in Indore, to see how the machine was able to save the trees from getting cut.
“It takes 10 years to grow a tree but this machine seems to be apt for the job and looks powerful,” Bal Mukul Chaudhary said.
faisul@risingkashmir.com

February 11, 2019 00:27:40 | Faisul Yaseen

Sterlite Power to start ‘tree translocation’

              

 To promote greener ecosystem, Sterlite Power, one of India’s largest power transmission sector players, instead of cutting trees coming in way of transmission lines and towers would start “tree translocation”.
Sterlite Power is the leading global developer of power transmission infrastructure with projects of over 12,816 circuit km and 22,044 MVA in India and Brazil, the largest country in South America.
Last year, Sterlite Power announced commissioning of 414-km long Rs 3000 crore Northern Region Strengthening Scheme 29 (NRSS 29), its flagship project critical for meeting the power requirements of Jammu Kashmir.
CEO, Global Infrastructure, Sterlite Power, Ved Mani Tiwari said the idea of “tree translocation” was to implement the project in the most environment-friendly manner.
He said the project was Sterlite Power’s way of contributing to promote a green habitat.
The initiative helps maintain air filtration and produces sufficient oxygen reducing soil erosion and conserving the energy.
The “transplanted trees” are provided alternate habitat within 500 metres to maintain the balance in the eco-system.
As part of its Khargone Transmission project (KTL), Sterlite Power is presently carrying its pilot project in Indore, the largest city of the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.
Talking to Rising Kashmir in Indore, Project Director, Sterlite Power, B K Singh said the company first surveyed 100 varieties of trees, studying their age and diameter.
“The idea is to make environment-friendly social impact innovation,” Singh said.
He said the success ratio of the survival of the “transplanted trees” was slightly less than 100 percent.
Illustrating the importance of the project, Singh said while the government intends to have 100 percent electrified villages, the requirement of power transmission lines was going up.
The project aims to reduce 40 percent of felling of trees.
Communication Head, Sterlite Power, Balaji Krishnaswami told Rising Kashmir that the company got the idea of starting “tree translocation” after receiving a WhatsApp video from Finland.
“In Finland, tree translocation is done in the mining industry, and in India it is done in the mining industry and forest development,” he said. “So, we thought why not in power.”
The “tree translocation” is carried with ‘Tree Transplanter Machine’, FMX 460 Model 8x4 Volvo Truck, which has an ‘Auto Transmission Gear Box’.
Three persons work simultaneously on the machine while transplanting the trees.
Volvo Technical Support Ravi Kumar, Technical Operators Kanta Raju and Satta Babu were the three men running the ‘Tree Transplanter Machine’ in Indore.
The trio had received training in Bangalore from the Swedish trainers.
Talking to Rising Kashmir, Volvo Technical Support Ravi Kumar said the ‘Tree Transplanter Machine’ operates with an “intelligent shifting gearbox” and being an “off-road vehicle”, it locks at 45 km/hour during “tree transplantation” and at 80 to 90 km/hour on road.
Farmers Bal Mukul Chaudhary, Shankar Chauhan, Dev Singh Chauhan and Radha Sham Chaudhary had come from Burana Kheri, a village nearby from where the pilot project is carried in Indore, to see how the machine was able to save the trees from getting cut.
“It takes 10 years to grow a tree but this machine seems to be apt for the job and looks powerful,” Bal Mukul Chaudhary said.
faisul@risingkashmir.com

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