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May 17, 2019 00:21:25 |

Medical Officers’ Appointments

The state government cancelled the appointment of 17 more Medical Officers (MO) who were recently appointed by the Health & Medical Education Department in continuation with the strict rules that MOs should attend the duties at their places of posting. Earlier, the government cancelled the appointment of 437 MOs (in the month of March) as majority of the officers (doctors) out of the 921 appointed did not join their places of posting. Less than one-third of the appointed MOs had joined the duties in accordance to the rules laid down by the government. However, the waiting list has not been discontinued with the intent that those next in the series if they adhered to government’s directions can join as Medical Officers. With the doctor-patient ratio at 1:1.6K in the state, it means a grave situation. Whether authorities agree or not, the trend is fraught with danger, as explained in this editorial. When the government decided to appoint medical officers, it was lauded for people are familiar about the dearth of doctors in state-run hospitals and health care institutions, which directly affects the services and performance of these institutions. Preference is always given to merit and the competence of those who are to be appointed. Since many meritorious candidates, doctors have been opting out of the government services in one way or the other, it has put a question mark on the future of the health care services in state-run hospitals. Competent doctors over the years have shown more interest in further studies and eventually leaving the government sector and the state for better prospects. The crisis in the state, in the form of brain drain with government offers failing to retain good doctors, is well known. Regarding the case of appointing Medical Officers and continuing the waiting list to offer the job to the next in line – the department must for obvious reasons give preference to qualified and competent doctors. If that principle was followed than in the first 921 appointments we can be sure that they were the deserving candidates. Since most of them did not join and their appointments were cancelled, it allowed the next and the next-to-the-next candidates to take their place. Is government openly compromising with the quality of the health care services by its hard posture? If qualified doctors stay away from the services, the government must have put its focus on finding out the reasons, and perhaps figured out a solution. Instead, it is trying to simply fill in the posts. What if candidates with average expertise get appointed and tomorrow become an issue? Isn’t that what happened with the appointment of teachers with some that were later not able to even write an essay? Instead of filling the posts the department needs to use its head, the right thinking.           

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May 17, 2019 00:21:25 |

Medical Officers’ Appointments

              

The state government cancelled the appointment of 17 more Medical Officers (MO) who were recently appointed by the Health & Medical Education Department in continuation with the strict rules that MOs should attend the duties at their places of posting. Earlier, the government cancelled the appointment of 437 MOs (in the month of March) as majority of the officers (doctors) out of the 921 appointed did not join their places of posting. Less than one-third of the appointed MOs had joined the duties in accordance to the rules laid down by the government. However, the waiting list has not been discontinued with the intent that those next in the series if they adhered to government’s directions can join as Medical Officers. With the doctor-patient ratio at 1:1.6K in the state, it means a grave situation. Whether authorities agree or not, the trend is fraught with danger, as explained in this editorial. When the government decided to appoint medical officers, it was lauded for people are familiar about the dearth of doctors in state-run hospitals and health care institutions, which directly affects the services and performance of these institutions. Preference is always given to merit and the competence of those who are to be appointed. Since many meritorious candidates, doctors have been opting out of the government services in one way or the other, it has put a question mark on the future of the health care services in state-run hospitals. Competent doctors over the years have shown more interest in further studies and eventually leaving the government sector and the state for better prospects. The crisis in the state, in the form of brain drain with government offers failing to retain good doctors, is well known. Regarding the case of appointing Medical Officers and continuing the waiting list to offer the job to the next in line – the department must for obvious reasons give preference to qualified and competent doctors. If that principle was followed than in the first 921 appointments we can be sure that they were the deserving candidates. Since most of them did not join and their appointments were cancelled, it allowed the next and the next-to-the-next candidates to take their place. Is government openly compromising with the quality of the health care services by its hard posture? If qualified doctors stay away from the services, the government must have put its focus on finding out the reasons, and perhaps figured out a solution. Instead, it is trying to simply fill in the posts. What if candidates with average expertise get appointed and tomorrow become an issue? Isn’t that what happened with the appointment of teachers with some that were later not able to even write an essay? Instead of filling the posts the department needs to use its head, the right thinking.           

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