• Search
July 09, 2019 00:07:00 |

Caught in gridlock

On Sunday commuters were surprised and equally roiled to witness severe traffic jams in the city, especially in areas like Natipora, Lal Chowk and on Abdullah Bridge. There was no relief despite the closure of the offices, schools and business centers as it was a holiday. While as heavy rush of traffic and the ensuing gridlock in Natipora-Chanapora areas was witnessed in the evening, it was a complete mess a little later in Lal Chowk and on Abdullah Bridge. Reportedly there was no sign of traffic cops at around 8 pm anywhere, which gave commuters chance to flout ever rule that is in the book. Traffic congestion in Kashmir and particularly in Srinagar is a chronic disease that hurts when people tend to move on busy roads and through marketplaces. In the absence of traffic officials there is complete anarchy with vehicles squeezing against each other and closing on the intersections to freeze the movement. Traffic officials are not the only ones to be blamed as successive governments have shown utter negligence towards implementing Master Plan recommendations. Although there has been nothing masterly in the Master Plans so far, but government in the past had promised to complete the road widening project in the city to provide relief to the commuters. In retrospect no major development in Srinagar would have taken place in last more than eight years had Asian Development Bank not provided the assistance. Major projects including the flyover and the car parking were funded by ADB. If ADB’s contribution has been so significant, people expect that under ‘Smart City’ all minor civic issues would have been taken care of.  However the picture of the city reveals snarl-ups, defunct drainage system and broken down municipality system.  To travel a small distance at Regal Chowk, Amira Kadal, Hari Singh High Street, Jehangir Chowk, Dalgate, Tourist Reception Centre, Rambagh, Batmaloo, Qamarwari, Pantha Chowk and a dozen other vicinities sometimes takes as hour and more. Traffic signals sometimes work and sometimes they don’t. Traffic jams are also witnessed in other districts and towns like Pattan, Baramulla, Ganderbal, Bandipora, Anantnag and on Srinagar-Jammu highway. Bottlenecks have been identified in high level meetings, but traffic management plans are still far from bringing any change. Srinagar is one among those cities where people don’t know where bus stop is; courtesy the traffic department. The governor administration must take stock of the situation. Traffic cops must be deployed in late evening hours at least during summer months. Traffic signals need to be followed strictly, whether it is an ordinary citizen or a state VIP, everyone has equal right to reach the place on time.

July 09, 2019 00:07:00 |

Caught in gridlock

              

On Sunday commuters were surprised and equally roiled to witness severe traffic jams in the city, especially in areas like Natipora, Lal Chowk and on Abdullah Bridge. There was no relief despite the closure of the offices, schools and business centers as it was a holiday. While as heavy rush of traffic and the ensuing gridlock in Natipora-Chanapora areas was witnessed in the evening, it was a complete mess a little later in Lal Chowk and on Abdullah Bridge. Reportedly there was no sign of traffic cops at around 8 pm anywhere, which gave commuters chance to flout ever rule that is in the book. Traffic congestion in Kashmir and particularly in Srinagar is a chronic disease that hurts when people tend to move on busy roads and through marketplaces. In the absence of traffic officials there is complete anarchy with vehicles squeezing against each other and closing on the intersections to freeze the movement. Traffic officials are not the only ones to be blamed as successive governments have shown utter negligence towards implementing Master Plan recommendations. Although there has been nothing masterly in the Master Plans so far, but government in the past had promised to complete the road widening project in the city to provide relief to the commuters. In retrospect no major development in Srinagar would have taken place in last more than eight years had Asian Development Bank not provided the assistance. Major projects including the flyover and the car parking were funded by ADB. If ADB’s contribution has been so significant, people expect that under ‘Smart City’ all minor civic issues would have been taken care of.  However the picture of the city reveals snarl-ups, defunct drainage system and broken down municipality system.  To travel a small distance at Regal Chowk, Amira Kadal, Hari Singh High Street, Jehangir Chowk, Dalgate, Tourist Reception Centre, Rambagh, Batmaloo, Qamarwari, Pantha Chowk and a dozen other vicinities sometimes takes as hour and more. Traffic signals sometimes work and sometimes they don’t. Traffic jams are also witnessed in other districts and towns like Pattan, Baramulla, Ganderbal, Bandipora, Anantnag and on Srinagar-Jammu highway. Bottlenecks have been identified in high level meetings, but traffic management plans are still far from bringing any change. Srinagar is one among those cities where people don’t know where bus stop is; courtesy the traffic department. The governor administration must take stock of the situation. Traffic cops must be deployed in late evening hours at least during summer months. Traffic signals need to be followed strictly, whether it is an ordinary citizen or a state VIP, everyone has equal right to reach the place on time.

News From Rising Kashmir

;