About Us | Contact Us | E-Paper

Breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic

Furthermore, certain minerals and vitamins are necessary for body processes such as wound healing (e.g. vitamin C and zinc). Nutritional demands during lactation are strong and will harm both you and your child if not fulfilled. Your regular diet would be

Post by on Wednesday, May 12, 2021

First slide
Decency Rajput Chowdhury

During the first 6 months, the infant is only given breast milk and is completely dependent on the mother for all food requirements. Eating a balanced diet during breastfeeding is important because diet influences protein, mineral, and vitamin content of breast milk. 

Furthermore, certain minerals and vitamins are necessary for body processes such as wound healing (e.g. vitamin C and zinc). Nutritional demands during lactation are strong and will harm both you and your child if not fulfilled. Your regular diet would be sufficient if you choose and prepare suitable foods.

Nutritional requirements 

Breast milk intake increases nutritional requirements during breastfeeding. They must satisfy the needs of both the baby and the mum.

Energy

A lactating mother requires an extra 500 kcal for the first six months and 400 kcal for the next six months. This can be met by consuming additional 6-8 slices of bread every day. Simply consuming more of the daily healthy diet should suffice to satisfy the increased energy demand when breastfeeding. 100 mL of human milk contains approximately 70 kcal of energy. 750 ml of breast milk is provided every day for the first six months after birth. Protein

When compared to energy needs, the rise in protein requirements during lactation is modest. Protein, on the other hand, can be used for energy output if the energy consumption is minimal. Eating protein-rich foods can help meet the extra protein needs during lactation (e.g. one egg or 25 g of cheese or 175 g of milk). Casein protein is an essential component of your milk that helps to deliver calcium and phosphate to your infant. Protein content, rather than protein abundance, influences insulin resistance. Fish proteins can have the most beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity.

Other nutrients

Any nutrients (for example, vitamins C, A, thiamine, riboflavin, B6, B12, iodine, and selenium) are reflected in the composition of your breast milk. Since newborn babies have very low levels of these nutrients, they depend on breast milk for a sufficient supply. Iodine-rich foods include fish and iodized salt. What you eat has little effect on the minerals in your breast milk, such as zinc, iron, folic acid, vitamin D, calcium, and copper. Despite changes in the mother's diet or body reserves, the levels of these nutrients in human milk remain stable. Consumption of these foods, both dietary and supplementary, would help you more than your baby during lactation. 

Since calcium is needed for milk production during lactation, it is necessary. During the first six months after delivery, a daily calcium intake of 1000 mg is expected. In addition to consuming calcium-rich foods like green leafy vegetables and fish, 500 mL of milk or milk products a day is needed.

Nutrient requirements in pregnancy and lactation

The table below summarises the daily requirements for some essential nutrients during pregnancy and lactation. The information presented is for women aged 19 to 30. Outside of the age range, there might be certain differences in everyday criteria. When compared to birth, breastfeeding needs more calories and vitamin A. Additional calcium increases during pregnancy and lactation are not needed in women whose diet is high in dairy products and other calcium-rich foods.

 

Nutrient requirements in pregnancy and lactation

The table below summarises the daily requirements for some essential nutrients during pregnancy and lactation. The information presented is for women aged 19 to 30. Outside of the age range, there might be certain differences in everyday criteria. When compared to birth, breastfeeding needs more calories and vitamin A. Additional calcium increases during pregnancy and lactation are not needed in women whose diet is high in dairy products and other calcium-rich foods.

 

Nutrient

Normal

recommended

intake

   Recommended

intake during

pregnancy

  Recommended

intake during

lactation

 Energy (kcal)

 2,000

 2,450

 2,500

 Protein (g)

 46

 71

 71

 Vitamin A (μg)

 700

 770

 1,300

 Iron (mg)

 18

 27

 9

 Folic acid (μg)

 400

 600

 500

 Iodine (μg)

 150

 220

 290

 Calcium (mg)

 1,000

 1,000

 1,000

 Zinc (mg)

 8

 11

 12

 Vitamin B12 (μg)

 2.4

 2.6

 2.8

 

 

Nutrient supplementation during breastfeeding

No less than eight weeks after launch, a single dosage of 200,000 IU should be taken. Iron and folic acid supplements during lactation may not be required in countries where the incidence of anaemia is less than 40%, as long as sufficient levels of these nutrients are derived from the diet.

Things to avoid during breastfeeding

●       Caffeine use should be kept to a minimum. 

●       When it comes to drugs, be cautious. 

●       It is best to avoid alcohol and smoke. They have the potential to make your baby tired, anxious, and irritable. 

●       Resist the need to lose weight by diet or medicine.

 

 

Breastfeeding and Covid 19 

So far, the infection has not been detected in breast milk, and both mothers are encouraged to continue breastfeeding while maintaining proper feeding hygiene. Practice the three Ws: 

●     Wear a mask when nursing

●     Wash your hands with soap before and after holding the infant

●     Wash and disinfect surfaces on a daily basis. 

The biggest concern for a baby is contracting the virus by direct contact with the mother or another sick family member. If someone in the family is ill, take special precautions to support your baby by following the three Ws. To ensure that their infant is properly covered, certain mothers may opt to wear a mask during feeding as a routine. If a mother believes she has coronavirus, she should feed the baby with a clean cup or a spoon.

2. Take additional hygiene measures and continue to breastfeed if you fall sick

 

Mothers who become infected with coronavirus shortly before giving birth and starting breastfeeding, as well as those who become infected during breastfeeding, develop immune factors (antibodies) in their milk to shield their baby and boost the baby's own immune responses. This ensures that trying to breastfeed the kid is the only way to combat the infection and heal him or her. 

When a mother becomes ill with signs such as fever, coughing, or trouble breathing, she can obtain medical attention as soon as possible and follow the advice of a healthcare provider. 

Mothers who are able to breastfeed should continue to do so, take extra precautions for hygiene and follow the 3 Ws, including wearing a mask while they are around the infant.

 

3. Use a cup and spoon to feed babies with expressed breastmilk

When mothers are unable to breastfeed their children, they should obtain urgent medical attention. It might also be possible to pump milk and have a non-infected family member feed the baby with a clean cup or cup and spoon. To keep the baby stable and happy, it would be much more necessary to adopt the three Ws at all times.

 

4.  Take extra care when formula feeding

Breastfeeding is the only way to get optimal nutrition for a baby's balanced growth and development. However, there are times where a woman is unable to breastfeed or chooses not to breastfeed. Furthermore, the pervasive selling of formula milks destroys many mothers' interest and encourages them to feed their babies with bottles and formula milks. It is particularly critical in these situations that babies are fed according to the guidelines on the package and that extra precaution is taken to properly wash bottles, teats, and all other equipment used. The three Ws must be observed at all times.

 


Latest Post